• Welcome To The Readington Middle School Speech-Language Website
     
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    What is Speech and Language?

    Speech is the actual physical aspects of communicating a message.  There are three aspects of speech.

    1)      Articulation: The production of single sounds in all positions of words.

    2)      Fluency:  This refers to how smoothly sounds, phrases and sentences flow

    when speaking.

    3)      Voice:  the quality of sound production involving the volume and pitch

    appropriate for a child’s age and gender.

    Language refers to an organized set of symbols or a code used to communicate.  There are three components involved in language, which determine ‘what we say’, ‘how we say it’ and ‘why we say it.’

    1)      Content: (what we say) This refers to the meaning that the child expresses or

    understands.

    2)      Form: (how we say it) The understanding and use of grammatical structures

    including plural and verb forms.

    3)      Use: (why we say it) The reason or purpose for communicating.  This is how

    a child understands and uses verbal and non-verbal language in a variety of

    situations.  This includes the social use of language including initiating conversation, turn-taking during conversation, using greetings and salutations,

    asking and answering questions appropriately and understanding and expressing feelings and emotions.

     

    Who addresses speech/language concerns in our schools?

    Certified speech/language specialists along with teachers, learning consultants, social workers and psychologists identify individuals with speech and/or language difficulties within our schools.  The speech/language specialist also provides intervention to students eligible for services and acts as a consultant to teachers, parents and paraprofessionals.

                                     

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    For additional speech/language information please refer to the following sites:

    http://www.njsha.org

    http://www.asha.org

Last Modified on March 1, 2007